Centrifugal Pumps

Manufacturer Type Markets
Craver Pump Centrifugal Pumps Carver Multi-Stage, Process, API Pumps
  • Industrial
  • Marine
  • Pulp and Paper
  • Power Generation
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Griswold Centrifugal Pumps Griswold Centrifugal, ANSI Pumps
  • General industry
  • Power
  • Oil and Gas
  • Food and beverage
  • Wastewater
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FYBROC Centrifugal Pumps Fybroc Fiberglass ANSI and Mag Drive & VTP & Vertical Sump Pumps
  • Chemical
  • Pulp and Paper
  • Industrial Waste
  • Power
  • Oil and Gas
  • Food and beverage
  • Municipal Wastewater
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National Pump Company Centrifugal Pumps National Pump Company Vertical Turbine, Barrel, API & Submersible Turbine Pumps
  • Agriculture
  • Industrial
  • Marine
  • Municipal
  • Petroleum
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Vertiflo Pump Company Centrifugal Pumps Vertiflo Vertical Sump and Process Pumps
  • Industrial
  • Chemical
  • Food and Beverage
  • Condensate removal
  • Agricultural
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Verder - passion for pumps Centrifugal Pumps Verder Sanitary Centrifugal Pumps
  • Chemical
  • Food and Beverage
  • Pharmaceutical
  • Pulp and Paper
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Barmesa Pumps Centrifugal Pumps Barmesa Submersible, Self-Priming, Stainless Steel End-Suction Pumps
  • General industry
  • Food and beverage
  • Wastewater
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Cornell Cornell Food Processing, Refrigeration, Self-Priming, Process Pumps
  • Food and Beverage
  • Agriculture
  • Industrial
  • Municipal & Industrial Wastewater
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Dickow Pumpen Centrifugal Pumps Dickow API Mag-drive Pumps
  • Chemical
  • Oil and Gas
  • Power
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Iwaki America Centrifugal Pumps Iwaki Centrifugal lined ANSI Mag Drive
  • Chemical
  • Water Treatment
  • Metal finishing
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MTH Pumps Centrifugal Pumps MTH Regenerative Turbine Pumps
  • Boiler Feed
  • Booster
  • Chemical processing
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Crane Centrifugal Pumps Crane/Barnes/Burk/Crown
  • Commercial
  • Industrial
  • Municipal
  • Residential
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About Centrifugal Pumps

Many industries use centrifugal pumps to move process fluids through a diverse array of systems. Among the common industrial applications of these systems are

  • Industrial production
  • Agriculture
  • Municipal power generation
  • Petroleum

A centrifugal pump is the most common type of pump and belongs to the kinetic pump family. Kinetic pumps use high velocity to facilitate liquid flow. Having a better understanding of centrifugal pumps can help determine whether they’re the best option for your next application.

How Does a Centrifugal Pump Work?

To create the necessary velocity to produce liquid flow, a centrifugal pump includes three components: 

  • Impeller: This component produces the necessary rotation to bring the liquid to the appropriate velocity
  • Casing: Sometimes referred to as the pump volute, the casing contains the velocity of the liquid produced by the impeller and channels it for a stable flow
  • Rotational mechanics: These elements of the pump include any mechanical parts that make it possible for the impeller to rotate within the casing 

Like all kinetic pumps, centrifugal pumps function via kinetic energy. Centrifugal energy occurs when an object changes directions but its inertia creates a pull toward the initial direction in which it was headed. Centrifugal pumps produce this type of energy by accelerating an impeller immersed in a liquid. This high-velocity movement creates pressure, which forces the liquid to its outer rim, where a pump outlet in the casing channels its flow. 

For a centrifugal pump to work, the velocity of the impeller must always exceed that of the liquid flow’s velocity. The pumping action is only possible because of the resistance to the kinetic energy created by the impeller. The pump casing forms this resistance and slows down the flow of the liquid, which converts kinetic energy into pressure energy. 

A centrifugal pump cannot function independently. A pumping unit with some sort of driver, usually an electric motor, must accompany it. Pump drivers are not limited to electric motors. Gas and steam turbines are also forms of pump drivers that assist centrifugal pumps. Regardless of the power source used to drive them, the most common pump driver units are frame-mounted, end suction pumps.

Centrifugal Pump Terms

To obtain a clearer understanding of centrifugal pumps, it’s helpful to examine the various terms associated with them. The most common terms used include: 

  • Static suction lift: This term relates to situation in which the supply source is lower than the pump centerline. It refers to the vertical distance between the centerline of the pump to the free level of the liquid being pumped.
  • Static suction head: When the source of supply is above the pump centerline, this term refers to the vertical measurement from the pump centerline to the free level of the liquid being pumped.
  • Static discharge head: This term relates to the discharge of the liquid into a discharge tank. It measures the vertical distance from the centerline of the pump to the surface of the liquid in the discharge tank.
  • Total static head: A combined sum of the static suction measurements (either suction lift or suction head) with the static discharge head provides the measurement labeled as total static head. 

These terms are important considerations used in the process of engineering a centrifugal pump for a specific application.

Working With Glauber Equipment

Glauber Equipment specializes in the production of a broad range of centrifugal pumps to meet the specific applications of our clients. Several industrial uses are among those applications, including: 

With almost 60 years of experience, we have the necessary expertise to provide the right solution to meet any challenge our clients might present. We meet those challenges through designing and building the pump that best serves the need, and we back up our pumps with exceptional customer service.

Contact Us or request a quote today if you would like to learn how we can help with your next pumping challenge!